Released Turtles

 Here's who we've released in 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016!!

Rehabilitation of sick and injured sea turtles is an important part of Sea Turtle, Inc's mission to save sea turtles! Each year, we rehabilitate anywhere from 40 to 100+ patients and release them back to the ocean. The rehabilitation process can take days, months, or sometimes years, depending on our patient and its injury. Here are stories about some of the sea turtles we have rescued and returned to the ocean in the past two years.

 

 

 

Cupid

Cupid

Stranded 2/14/2015

Cupid is an Atlantic green sea turtle. She was entangled in fishing line and was found offshore by a Texas shrimper. He noticed Cupid had gone through his Turtle Exclude Device (an apparatus in shrimp trawls that prevent sea turtles from getting caught and drowned in the nets). When he saw that Cupid was tangled in monofilament line, he rescued her and called Sea Turtle, Inc. for assistance. They named her "Cupid" because it was Valentine's Day!
Cupid's injuries were minor and she is swimming in an outside rehabilitation tank.

Stranded 4/8/2015


Peanut

Peanut

Stranded 11/14/2014

Peanut is a juvenile Atlantic green sea turtle. She originally stranded during a cold front in November. When brought in, she was in a deep state of shock and could not be woken up. It was uncertain if she would survive. After three days of heat therapy, she eventually began to regain strength and move around. She has several large scrapes on her carapace and plastron (top and bottom parts of the shell), possibly due to a predator attack. She is being treated in our ICU.
December update: Peanut is eating well and has been moved to Rehabilitation Tank 1. She will be released in Spring of 2015.

Released 2/15/2015


You Know Who

You-Know-Who

Stranded 11/14/2014

You Know Who was found on Boca Chica during a cold spell on South Padre Island. He has very severe injuries due to a possible boat impact. His carapace is heavily fractured in several places. Screws had to be placed in the larger fractures in order to keep the shell together. Shell wounds are very severe and can be very difficult to heal. He is recovering in ICU.

January Update: You Know Who continues to recover in ICU. He is starting to show interest in food but the cracks in his carapace are still very unstable. He remains in critical condition.

February Update: You Know Who is now eating on his own. He has zip ties on his back to keep the bones stable and the wound is starting to heal. He is no longer in critical condition!

June Update: YKW's wounds are healing well and he has been moved to a rehabilitation tank. He is cleared for release!

Released 7/29/2015


Nacle

Nacle

Stranded 11/15/2014

Nacle was found in Barracuda Cove during a cold spell on South Padre Island. She has 2 large slice wounds in her carapace & one on her head. These wounds were most likely caused by a boat propeller. Nacle's spine is exposed and  she is in critical condition in our ICU.

January Update: Nacle is still in our ICU. She is starting to show interest in food and her shell wound is healing. She is no longer in critical condtion.

February Update: Nacle is doing very well and she has been moved to an outdoor rehabilitation tank!

Released 4/8/2015


Ivy

Ivy

Stranded 11/20/2014

Ivy is a juvenile Atlantic green sea turtle. She was found on the beach, embedded in the sand. It is possible that she was the victim of a vehicle impact but the cause of her injuries are unknown. She does not have use of her front left flipper and it is swollen. X-rays show that she has a large fracture right near her shoulder joint. These types of breaks are difficult to heal. Ivy is resting in an ICU area away from public display so that we can keep her still and give her flipper a rest.

January Update: Ivy is starting to eat but remains in ICU. A large puncture wound leading to the fracture is being treated for an infection. We are still hopeful that Ivy's flipper will eventually heal to full functionality.

February Update:   Ivy's fracture is not healing as well as we hoped. Unfortunately, the decision was made to amputate her flipper. She is currently recovering from surgery.

Stranded 5/6/2015


Jade

JadeStranded 11/26/2014

Jade was found on the South Padre Island jetties, about halfway up. A couple found her trapped between the rocks and dislodged her. She has several scrapes and areas of exposed bone on her head, carapace & plastron. She is being treated in ICU for her injuries.
December update: Jade has been moved to a rehabilitation tank outside. She is eating well and her injuries are improving. She is still on antibiotics.

 

January Update: Jade has been moved to a rehab tank outside!

 

Released 2/15/2015


Pilgrim

PilgrimStranded 11/27/2014

Pilgrim is a juvenile Atlantic green sea turtle. He was found by a local paddle boarding at the south jetties on South Padre. Pilgrim was completely entangled in fishing line but luckily it did not do any serious damage to his flippers. He will be released by the end of 2014.

Released 12/15/2014


Clifford

Clifford

Stranded 11/14/2014

Clifford is a juvenile Atlantic green sea turtle. He was found in Barracuda Cove near Boca Chica with several other cold stunned sea turtles. Clifford has several large wounds on his back, most likely from getting struck by a boat propeller. He is currently in ICU.

January Update: Clifford has been moved to a rehabilitation tank outside but remains on antibiotics for his wounds. He is eating well.

Released 4/8/2015


Holly Leaf

Holly-Leaf

Stranded 10/18/2014

 

Holly Leaf is a juvenile Atlantic green sea turtle. She was found washed up on the county beaches of South Padre Island. Her shell was covered in barnacles and she has a large hole in the side of her face. What caused her injury is unknown. She is currently in ICU where we are monitoring her behavior and recovery.

 

Released 12/15/2014


Robbie

RobbieStranded 9/28/2014

Robbie is a juvenile Atlantic green sea turtle. He was found by visitors on the county beaches of SPI. He had no severe physical injuries but some small scrapes on his shell suggest that he may have been nibbled on by a predator. Additionally he has several large barnacles, including one that is attached to his head. To remove barnacles, we will let the turtle live in fresh water for several days. Fresh water does not hurt sea turtles for short periods of time and it will kill the barnacle and cause it to fall off.

Robbie is expected to make a quick recovery!

Released 10/17/2014